Attention: Please take a moment to consider our terms and conditions before posting.

Here's One To Think About

European Match

Be it Champions League or Europa League, when you get to the Knock-Out stage you often hear commentators cream themselves if an English club has finished the first tie, away, and won 1-nil. They describe this invariably as a "priceless away goal" We've had it with both Man U and Spurs this season.
So.....please tell me, when does an away goal in a first leg 1-0 win ACTUALLY mean anything more than a goal? Think about it. There is no scenario where this goal will EVER count double.

Or am I talking crap?

Comments

  • By my reckoning, you are quite right. To draw the game the foreign team will win 1-0 with a priceless away goal of their own or with even more priceless away goals in a higher scoring one goal victory, which will yake them through.
    It just more evidence for the idea that football pundits just repeat the same old cliches without actually thinking for themselves.
  • if the oppo scores 0 at home and 1 away and you only score once in the two ties, you want it to be a priceless away one.
  • [cite]Posted By: Holdkneebomb[/cite]if the oppo scores 0 at home and 1 away and you only score once in the two ties, you want it to be a priceless away one.
    .
    Yes, but the thread is based on kicking off with a 1-0 win, with adjectives being applied to goals only at the end of the 90 minutes.
  • [cite]Posted By: Uboat[/cite]
    [cite]Posted By: Holdkneebomb[/cite]if the oppo scores 0 at home and 1 away and you only score once in the two ties, you want it to be a priceless away one.
    .
    Yes, but the thread is based on kicking off with a 1-0 win, with adjectives being applied to goals only at the end of the 90 minutes.

    Thank you Uboat. Some people just don't read things properly.

    It's not a joke/trick etc. Just an observation.
  • I know what you mean Chirpy, but I think I've observed it differently - ie that the commentators refer to it as a 'priceless away goal' at the point at which it is scored. In the context of the game, this can be significant in that if the opposition don't score, the away side have a lead to take home (significant), while even if the opposition do get an equaliser then at that point the away goal becomes a potential 'away goals count double' goal (also significant).
    I'm not sure I've noticed it referred to as an 'important away goal' after the first leg has finished, but if, as you say, it's been said before, maybe they're referring to the fact that the opposition now have to go to an away ground and score - a task generally considered more difficult than scoring on your home turf.
    I don't know - pure speculation on my part.
  • What the noble Lord said!
  • What the noble Lord said!
  • I do believe Chirpy is right

    (for once)

    :-)
  • Would it be that the goal would only be "priceless" if the game ended in a draw or a defeat so then at home it would count as double if you got the score back level or took the lead on aggregate?

    By jove I think you're right Chirpy, a 0-1 win away is just a win away, that goal really doesn't have the doubling ability that it is supposed to have
    I believed them commentators all this time and they were doing a disservice to the football fans all along and telling us porky pies

    Good Spot!
  • I thought away goals, rather than priceless", always counted as "double" on ITV.
  • Sponsored links:


  • edited April 2011
    I think it can mean that the goal is priceless because they are 50% of their way at the time of scoring to a possible priceless second away goal, which could make the difference if they lost the game 1-0 at home.

    Yours sincerely
    Maris Piper
    A common 'tato
  • [cite]Posted By: lordromford[/cite]I know what you mean Chirpy, but I think I've observed it differently - ie that the commentators refer to it as a 'priceless away goal'at the point at which it is scored.In the context of the game, this can be significant in that if the opposition don't score, the away side have a lead to take home (significant), while even if the oppositiondoget an equaliser then at that point the away goal becomes a potential 'away goals count double' goal (also significant).
    I'm not sure I've noticed it referred to as an 'important away goal'afterthe first leg has finished, but if, as you say, it's been said before, maybe they're referring to the fact that the opposition now have to go to an away ground and score - a task generally considered more difficult than scoring on your home turf.
    I don't know - pure speculation on my part.

    I have definately heard "priceless" in a post match report on more than one occasion. Alan Green this season for sure.
  • Away goals don't count double. If the scores are level at full time, or after extra time domestically, then the number of away goals is the tie breaker. So although a 0-1 away win is an advantage it means nothing more than just a goal, Chirpy is correct.
  • [cite]Posted By: Friend Or Defoe[/cite]Away goals don't count double. If the scores are level at full time, or after extra time domestically, then the number of away goals is the tie breaker. So although a 0-1 away win is an advantage it means nothing more than just a goal, Chirpy is correct.

    You're right, they don't count double - or, even, need to. If we are into pedantry, they could be worth 1.0000001 goals for each real goal in the event of an aggregate tie and it would have the same effect.
  • It's just an easy way of saying that in the event of a draw the team who has scored more away goals goes through, but some people do get confused by it.
  • [cite]Posted By: Chirpy Red[/cite]
    [cite]Posted By: lordromford[/cite]I know what you mean Chirpy, but I think I've observed it differently - ie that the commentators refer to it as a 'priceless away goal'at the point at which it is scored.In the context of the game, this can be significant in that if the opposition don't score, the away side have a lead to take home (significant), while even if the oppositiondoget an equaliser then at that point the away goal becomes a potential 'away goals count double' goal (also significant).
    I'm not sure I've noticed it referred to as an 'important away goal'afterthe first leg has finished, but if, as you say, it's been said before, maybe they're referring to the fact that the opposition now have to go to an away ground and score - a task generally considered more difficult than scoring on your home turf.
    I don't know - pure speculation on my part.

    I have definately heard "priceless" in a post match report on more than one occasion. Alan Green this season for sure.

    Oh, I don't doubt it at all Chirps. To be honest, I was trying to think of a considered reason why a commentator might react in such a way and that was the best I could do. Realistically, I think you're probably right and it's just become overused and inadequately thought through language.
    Such is the world in which we live.
  • It negates the effect of conceding a home goal so in effect it is worth double if you concede one at home. It means that the opposition needs to score twice to beat you rather than once if you don't have a 'priceless away goal' of your own.

    To that effect does count double, otherwise the opposition's first goal does.
  • Priceless away goal for Barca.
Sign In or Register to comment.

Roland Out!