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Do any other Lifers have any experience with Strokes?

Hi all,

Just wanted to see if anyone on here has any experience of strokes? Either first hand or knows someone close to them that has had one? My Dad had his second one in three years this week (mentioned in another post), he is at home and will make a full recovery. He feels like he has a ticking time bomb hanging over him.

This site has a wealth of knowledge and some cracking advice that I have read over the years, so wanted to see if anyone has ant tips, advice etc.

My Dad adopted a healthy lifestyle after his first stroke, retired, gym 3 times a week, eating healthy etc. So his second came as a shock.

He is an avid reader of this site, so any advice would be greatly appreciated.

p.s the only stress he has in his life is Charlton :)

Comments

  • My dad had one about 2 years ago. The 2 year anniversary of him passing is in about 9 days time.

    I'd love to give you advice re recovery but I wasn't given the chance to experience him recovering. The thing that killed him was th time delay from when he had the stroke to the time he went to the doctors. Although when he has it, we called an ambulance, they done literally feck all and then I took him to see the doc about 10 days later.

    I think the only advice I have is get a blood pressure monitor. Easy to pick up from boots and monitor your blood pressure daily (if you haven't already done so). If it's getting too high, go to your doctor.
  • My dad had one about 2 years ago. The 2 year anniversary of him passing is in about 9 days time.

    I'd love to give you advice re recovery but I wasn't given the chance to experience him recovering. The thing that killed him was th time delay from when he had the stroke to the time he went to the doctors. Although when he has it, we called an ambulance, they done literally feck all and then I took him to see the doc about 10 days later.

    I think the only advice I have is get a blood pressure monitor. Easy to pick up from boots and monitor your blood pressure daily (if you haven't already done so). If it's getting too high, go to your doctor.

    Sorry to hear about your Dad passing mate. Thanks for that tip, I will make sure he keeps on top of the blood pressure.
  • edited July 2016
    Blood pressure monitor is the best advice I can give (and it's already been given to you). Healthy diet is also crucial, healthy fats, cider vinegar, not much beer etc.

    Hope all is well in the near and further future for you both.
  • There is an organisation on line that has loads of info on strokes can't remember the name.
    My father lived 13 years after a major stroke . He never regained full mobility but he was 70z when he had it.
    Smoking, diet, stress, life style all play a part.
    A lot of the larger GPs surgerys have blood pressure monitors in them--- if it's high you hand the print out to the receptionist they book you into see the GP
    Most people that have strokes will be on medication -- wolverine (sic) is one and every 4/6 months blood tests are taken dosage adjusted
    At Xmas strokes and heart attacks go up --- stress related. My father had his three days before xmas
  • My mother in law aged 88 had a stroke last September.

    As a family we spend a lot of time caring for her.

    If you google variations of stroke, there is a load of information available & there is a stroke association who will offer advice & visit for free.

    If you have anything specific, please fell free to inbox me.

    http://www.webmd.com/stroke/features/stroke-recovery-tips-for-the-caregiver?page=3
  • edited July 2016
    I know someone who runs a stroke club. they offer support, help with carers if needed and benefits but on the most part its just a social thing. they go to the pub, have lunches and days out.
    I have asked my mate about whether its a good thing seeing others with strokes who might be even worse off than you but he says that it helps give you inspiration and understanding. also some like your dad will make a full recovery but they still carry on going as they have become mates with others at the club.
    I know someone else who goes to a Parkinson disease club, they say a similar thing. with that its slightly different but he said at first it made him feel worse as some who were there were at a later stage of the disease which makes you see and fear what's possibly to come for you. however after a few meetings he started to really enjoy the comradeship and the relationships you gain from these places.
    these clubs might not work for everyone but its worth looking into, especially if you no longer can work due to your illness. they give a bit of joy and the chance to socialise in what can be a difficult period in ones life.
  • I don't have any personal experience of this, but isn't a key factor the speed at which you get medical attention? Which means carrying a card at all times eg in wallet that gives instructions, and ensure that if you're out and about with other people, they know what to do (doesn't have to be an ongoing topic - tell friends etc what might happen and what you need them to do if it does, move on).
  • Fortunately not personally, a bloke at work I know well enough had one in his mid 40s (physically fit guy too)... apparently just got dizzy in the garden, went arse-over-tit, went to the hospital and they said he'd had a stroke. He was back in work within a month though, with no visible signs that he's had one - completely goes against my knowledge (=ignorance) about how strokes work and the effects.

    As per the 'brain injury' thread, I think this is something people on the whole don't know a huge amount about.

    (N.B. I initially came here to make a joke about Colin being particularly experienced at 'strokes', got a little sidetracked by the fact that Karim runs a 'stroke club'... but having read it, this is a pretty serious subject - so left it to the end)
  • Appreciate the replies people, given my dad the heads up to have a read. Will also check out the brain injury thread. Have a good weekend

  • Most people that have strokes will be on medication -- wolverine (sic) is one and every 4/6 months blood tests are taken dosage adjusted

    Warfarin. Correcting the spelling because it'll help if people want to google, rather than just being pedantic, although I did have a giggle at the mental image of Hugh Jackman being used to treat strokes.

    As others have said there are different types of stroke. My Nan had a TIA (mini-stroke) which Grandad described as being like her batteries suddenly ran down - she went slurry, garbled and then just keeled over onto the table. However, by the time the ambulance arrived and got her up to the hospital she was fine, and had no long term physical effects, although I think the slight cognitive decline she had in her last couple of years may have been related. Having a TIA means you're at increased risk of another one or a full blown stroke, so she had to take warfarin and attend the warfarin clinic at the hospital regularly.
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  • I had a stroke 2008 and although I had the high risk attributes it was caused by a birth defect . My Colesteral was 3.3
  • My ex husband had one when he was 40ish. He was physically fit and ran marathons with heavy rucksacks etc. He had walked down to the station to meet me as it was dark but couldn't walk in a straight line. No-one helped him as they thought he was drunk (usually they'd have been right!). I spotted him as he collapsed and then got an ambulance. He had trouble walking for quite a few months but the best advice we had was to keep using (or trying to use) the bits that didn't work. They said it applied to things like hands as well as legs, so eg to keep regular practice of trying to write etc. It seems to stimulate the part of the brain that needs to recover. Oh and to get plenty of rest - the brain really needs to have rest to recover and the ex used to sleep for hours.

    He did make a full recovery though and ran off with an 18 year old so his legs were working again!

    Oh and I fund the stroke association brilliant as a carer. Loads of leaflets (now probably on line info)

    Good luck
  • Can be caused by either a clot or a bleed. Obviously don't want to be on Wafarin if it was caused by the latter. Recovery depends on the damage caused by the blood starvation, which part of brain, and for how long.
  • vffvff
    edited July 2016
    Depends on the type of stroke which can impact speech, physical ability, memory and cognition. It can be really helpful to talk things over with the Physiotherapists, Occupational Therapists and Speech and Language therapists involved. Getting timely and the right rehabilitation is important. If people are motivated with the rehabilitation exercise which can take a lot of perservernce, recovery can be good. It is important to be encouraging and positive in supporting the person, who has experienced the stroke.

    Hopefully, your dad's medication is correct and has been checked recently. You can request a regular medication review from a senior pharmacist to make sure that the medication is correct. Pharmacists can optimise the medication or reduce. Often they may be better to ask than the GP as drugs is their speciality. Make sure they are experienced and senior. If your dad is on Warfarin, the levels should be regularly checked and you can ask at the anti coagulation clinic for them to review the medication as well.

    That is a good general tip for anyone on a lot of medication, particularly if a number of different doctors have been prescribing, request a medication review from the pharmacy, who may be able to reduce your medication or suggest a better combination. People's health changes over time and people can be on medication that is no longer needed.

    Your dad understandably is a bit worried. It sounds like he is doing a lot of the right things, which is great and that is definitely helpful in managing the risks & optimising health. Keep on reassuring him that he is doing the right thing. It sounds like some more specific reassurance would definitely help reduce the worry.

    You may find it useful checking out the Stroke Association

    https://www.stroke.org.uk/

    https://www.stroke.org.uk/what-stroke

    https://www.stroke.org.uk/finding-support - some good life after stroke advice / groups / online forum from people having survived strokes. Talking to other people, who have had strokes and their families can help alleviate the worry and pick up some tips.

    All the best @robroy to you and your dad.

    (I do some work attached to a specialist stroke recovery team).
  • Hi all. Just wanted to say thanks for all of the excellent info. The old man has had a decent read.
  • I,m a bit late on this but I had quite a bad stroke last year. All the advice you have been given is great. Rehabilitation unfortunately takes varying amounts of time. My stroke caused very little physical damage but cognitively it impaired me quite a lot. I do lots of brain training and having three kids keeps the brain alert and functioning. I am about 90% fit after 15 months but the fatigue kicks in regularly should I over do it. Strangely no doctor have found any reason whatsoever for my stroke and I was as physically fit as I have ever been when it happened so I am not so sure it can be avoided other than trying to do the obvious. Perseverance it the best advice. Good luck to your Dad.
  • And good luck to you Brunello. You've done brilliantly.
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