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Should of, Could of, Would of.

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    Should of gone to spec savers
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    Now, as every Lifer knows, this is wrong. It's ...have, not ...of.


    HOWEVER, I was reading The High Window by Raymond Chandler last week and there were two examples of ...of. This wasn't in reported speech, this was in the narrative, and the narrative made reference to "Jew" and "Negro" so it would appear to be the original text, not one brought up to date. So, either it was accepted use in 1942, or Chandler and his editor, or perhaps just his editor, were Katrien-class numpties.


    Discuss.

    I would guess that it was the editor because Chandler was very well educated. Or perhaps it was written from the point of view of Philip Marlowe who wasn't quite so well educated.

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    Fiiish said:

    bellz2002 said:

    Especially when teaching phonics in primary school and there are hundreds of exception words.

    Phonics is possibly the single worst thing introduced to school children. I have nine nieces and nephews and have had to put up listening to shit like:

    "How do you spell monkey?"
    MER ORH NER KER EHH YER

    Schools nowadays teach kids how to be thick. Nothing more or less. Even my 10 year old nephew has said school bores him because everything he is being taught has no real world relevance. Good luck having a high skilled workforce to pay for expensive retirement care when children do not learn anything remotely useful for the real world until they are 17.
    How the children of today must envy the education that allowed you to come up with such a considered comment.
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    edited March 2017
    Gillis said:

    Fiiish said:

    bellz2002 said:

    Especially when teaching phonics in primary school and there are hundreds of exception words.

    Phonics is possibly the single worst thing introduced to school children. I have nine nieces and nephews and have had to put up listening to shit like:

    "How do you spell monkey?"
    MER ORH NER KER EHH YER

    Schools nowadays teach kids how to be thick. Nothing more or less. Even my 10 year old nephew has said school bores him because everything he is being taught has no real world relevance. Good luck having a high skilled workforce to pay for expensive retirement care when children do not learn anything remotely useful for the real world until they are 17.
    How the children of today must envy the education that allowed you to come up with such a considered comment.
    More like the experience I have working in schools and the total nonsense that is on the curriculum, largely thanks to the Tories and their Victorian thinking. Even my nephew knows that nothing he is learning at the moment is of any use, or even remotely interesting. From the mouths of babes, as the expression goes.
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    Fiiish said:

    Gillis said:

    Fiiish said:

    bellz2002 said:

    Especially when teaching phonics in primary school and there are hundreds of exception words.

    Phonics is possibly the single worst thing introduced to school children. I have nine nieces and nephews and have had to put up listening to shit like:

    "How do you spell monkey?"
    MER ORH NER KER EHH YER

    Schools nowadays teach kids how to be thick. Nothing more or less. Even my 10 year old nephew has said school bores him because everything he is being taught has no real world relevance. Good luck having a high skilled workforce to pay for expensive retirement care when children do not learn anything remotely useful for the real world until they are 17.
    How the children of today must envy the education that allowed you to come up with such a considered comment.
    More like the experience I have working in schools and the total nonsense that is on the curriculum, largely thanks to the Tories and their Victorian thinking. Even my nephew knows that nothing he is learning at the moment is of any use, or even remotely interesting. From the mouths of babes, as the expression goes.
    If you have experience working in schools, then I'm surprised that you believe they are teaching children to be thick. Perhaps just hyperbole on your part.

    I'm sorry your nephew isn't enjoying school at the moment, but I'm not sure that justifies your sweeping statement.

    I agree that the current curriculum has its faults, and borders on the absurd in parts. I don't think, however, that it can be said to teach children how to be thick, nor that it's unrecognisable from the curricula that preceded it.
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    Gillis said:

    Fiiish said:

    Gillis said:

    Fiiish said:

    bellz2002 said:

    Especially when teaching phonics in primary school and there are hundreds of exception words.

    Phonics is possibly the single worst thing introduced to school children. I have nine nieces and nephews and have had to put up listening to shit like:

    "How do you spell monkey?"
    MER ORH NER KER EHH YER

    Schools nowadays teach kids how to be thick. Nothing more or less. Even my 10 year old nephew has said school bores him because everything he is being taught has no real world relevance. Good luck having a high skilled workforce to pay for expensive retirement care when children do not learn anything remotely useful for the real world until they are 17.
    How the children of today must envy the education that allowed you to come up with such a considered comment.
    More like the experience I have working in schools and the total nonsense that is on the curriculum, largely thanks to the Tories and their Victorian thinking. Even my nephew knows that nothing he is learning at the moment is of any use, or even remotely interesting. From the mouths of babes, as the expression goes.
    If you have experience working in schools, then I'm surprised that you believe they are teaching children to be thick. Perhaps just hyperbole on your part.

    I'm sorry your nephew isn't enjoying school at the moment, but I'm not sure that justifies your sweeping statement.

    I agree that the current curriculum has its faults, and borders on the absurd in parts. I don't think, however, that it can be said to teach children how to be thick, nor that it's unrecognisable from the curricula that preceded it.
    Yes it's hyperbole. In the same way that when people say Roland is killing the team, he isn't literally murdering people.
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    Fiiish said:

    Abbreviations exist largely thanks to the spoken word, not the written word. As a rule I generally avoid abbreviations in writing as there is little point in doing so. The main exceptions are when it flows better as a sentence such as it's and I'm.

    I'm'a'massive'fan as'ya'know
    I thought that was only Operation Pig?
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    JamesSeed said:

    JamesSeed said:

    Should of, could of etc is a misinterpretation of should've or could've, which themselves are abreviations of should have and could have.

    These things annoy some people more than others (see also incorrect use of its, & it's, their, there & they're, literally etc etc.

    People who take an exagerrated exception to these things are often called pedants.

    PS have I misspelled any of the above? Probably!

    Should have, could have, would have

    not

    Should of, Could of, Would of

    Keep up Jamo
    Blimey.

    Early bird gets the worm and you gotta be up pretty fuckin early to catch me out.
    The early bird may well get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.
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