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PPL & PRS Licences (Disco's etc)

DA9DA9
edited March 2009 in Not Sports Related
If the venue holds these licences, does the person playing the music, CD's or records, need a licence of any sort?

Cheers
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Comments

  • If they don't they should.

    You should here some of crap Carter and Ketman play - it should be illegal.
  • how was the Elvis bash mate, little un was a bit under the weather so couldnt make it.
  • [cite]Posted By: adamtheaddick[/cite]how was the Elvis bash mate, little un was a bit under the weather so couldnt make it.

    Excellent thanks fella, shame about your wee one, take a gander at Lee Jackson Elvis on Facebook and you can see a video of me bashing a tamborine and stomping my feet (thats not a metaphor incase anyone asks)
  • you have to be his friend just sent him a request.
  • In answer to your original question I believe the responsibility is to the venue. But I think maybe you are supposed to keep track of everything played to give to the venue so they can fill in their forms. I think you would need to know song, artist, album, record label, publishers etc. Its rare that they bother with small places though. I had to fill them in when I worked at Get Loaded and had to keep track of everything played by the DJs there.
  • Don't think small places have to keep track of what's played. Usually, PRS send someone to each venue once or twice a year to make note of tracks, and they would probably request a list. They then extrapolate from all these sample lists from all the different venues when deciding how much to dole out to all the various songwriters.

    I've written a few songs and got my last (twice yearly) PRS cheque recently... £1.77 woooh!
  • I Think thats the Elvis who has the Marilyn Monroe girlfriend. Bumped into him outside a boozer in Hornchurch. We all had 2 hours to kill so he had a few orange juices whilst telling stories of his Elvis experiences ...
  • BHAddick is right, prs "sample" what is played a couple of times each year. Radio stations get the same treatment as well.
  • As BDL says, radio stations are subject to 'sample days' - usually four per year- in which all info has to be noted for every track/commercial/jingle played.

    With regard to 'mobile' DJs, there would be some wisdom in paying a nominal fee for a licence, as while most all club venues will (should) be licensed, if you get a 'non-club' gig (weddings, etc), then you are covered to play.
  • It should be down to the venue, however in my eyes if you are a mobile disco/karaoke/singer it's at your own discretion as to whether you pay it or not. It's about 25-35 quid a year last I heard.

    My own personal opinion is the artist of whatever I'm playing got their money when I had to shell out for a download/CD of something I would not personally listen to but others request I play on a night.
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  • Problem comes if/when your 'own personal opinion' conflicts with the law (in respect of copyright and public performance).
  • Oh well....

    ;-)
  • DA9, if you are simply playing your CD/Vinyl collection, no you need no other licences than the venue's PRS and PPL licences for the public performance of the musical works (composers/publisher's rights administered by PRS) and the public performance of the sound recordings (record label's rights administered by PPL).

    However, if you have or intend to copy your music collection whether CD/Vinyl or digital tracks onto a digital storage medium which you'll use whilst DJing, you will need a ProDub licence from MCPS who offer a licence to cover the copying of the musical works and sound recordings on behalf of themselves and PPL.

    Hope this helps. Go to the MCPS licensing section on prsformusic's website for more details.
  • [cite]Posted By: Riscardo[/cite]I Think thats the Elvis who has the Marilyn Monroe girlfriend. Bumped into him outside a boozer in Hornchurch. We all had 2 hours to kill so he had a few orange juices whilst telling stories of his Elvis experiences ...

    It is the same guy, they are no longer together
  • [cite]Posted By: Pavo[/cite]DA9, if you are simply playing your CD/Vinyl collection, no you need no other licences than the venue's PRS and PPL licences for the public performance of the musical works (composers/publisher's rights administered by PRS) and the public performance of the sound recordings (record label's rights administered by PPL).

    However, if you have or intend to copy your music collection whether CD/Vinyl or digital tracks onto a digital storage medium which you'll use whilst DJing, you will need a ProDub licence from MCPS who offer a licence to cover the copying of the musical works and sound recordings on behalf of themselves and PPL.

    Hope this helps. Go to the MCPS licensing section on prsformusic's website for more details.

    It will be purely mine & a pals own CD collections played, although it will be advertised as a monthly disco, and we will be charging a small entry fee, we know the venue has all the correct licences.

    Cheers for the all the advice guys & gals.
  • Now, this is a really novice question, does a dual CD player with a mixer, mean you can fade one CD down, whilst turning up the other CD, ie, fading one song and straight into another song with seamless crossover, through the same Amp?

    Cheers
  • Yes. There are volume controls for each input as well as the regular crossfader in the middle.
  • Cheers fella, the crossfader being what I described above (fade 1 out, bring 1up)
  • I am dealing with PPL and PRS at the moment. Bleeding money for old rope this lark.

    Even have to pay for the music on hour "on hold" phone service and per line

    Eye opener
  • 2-1fab5.jpg

    Crossfading - DA9 Stylee
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  • You don't have to turn the volume down on either but thats what you use your mixing abilities and headphones to suss out, the crossfader is the DJ's friend and only real tool
  • Cheers all
  • DA9DA9
    edited April 2009
    I bought a 2nd hand Numark CD22 MK4 dual CD players off of Ebay, won the bid for £35, all in working order, just one 9 pIn cable needs replacing, anyone got any idea if this kit is OK?

    Numark%20CDN-22%20MK4.jpg
  • Not my Cup of Tea to be honest but they appear to have the Pitch bend on them & the emulation wheel which is what you need for Beat on Beat Mixing. If you have the money in the future get the Pioneer CDJ's there really is nothing to touch them, been using them for ten years.
  • I'm assuming you've got a mixer with it DA9 as it doesn't show it in the picture.

    Numark kit with a gemini mixer is what I've got and it has served me perfectly.
  • [cite]Posted By: Ledge[/cite]I am dealing with PPL and PRS at the moment. Bleeding money for old rope this lark.

    Even have to pay for the music on hour "on hold" phone service and per line

    Eye opener

    We've got em hounding us at work at the moment for the guys playing a radio in the warehouse. Jeeeeeeeeez! :-(
  • [cite]Posted By: KillersBeard[/cite]I'm assuming you've got a mixer with it DA9 as it doesn't show it in the picture.

    Numark kit with a gemini mixer is what I've got and it has served me perfectly.

    The guy I am going into partnership with is a singer, so he has a mixer, amps and cd player already, we just wanted a dual one, to see how it works out, and for £35 we dont mind finding out if its not upto the job.

    Cheers for the advice guys & gals
  • £35 is a bargain mate, take it to an electrical engineer and they will sort the plug out in no time. It's worth making or buying a case for them to save a bit of room and so they don't get bashed about.

    The pitch bend at the right has two controls. The plus and the minus buttons will do if your trying to drag a record down or just want to muck about and the fader control is for setting the pitch/speed/tempo at what you want but the red light will need to be on use the pitch button to turn that on and off.

    The wheel is for cueing your record and can be used for mucking about with the sound a bit too but I tend to leave them alone.

    They will serve you well and for £35 you will make money on them selling them to a part-time DJ or a venue to sit behind a bar.
  • [cite]Posted By: Carter[/cite]£35 is a bargain mate, take it to an electrical engineer and they will sort the plug out in no time. It's worth making or buying a case for them to save a bit of room and so they don't get bashed about.

    The pitch bend at the right has two controls. The plus and the minus buttons will do if your trying to drag a record down or just want to muck about and the fader control is for setting the pitch/speed/tempo at what you want but the red light will need to be on use the pitch button to turn that on and off.

    The wheel is for cueing your record and can be used for mucking about with the sound a bit too but I tend to leave them alone.

    They will serve you well and for £35 you will make money on them selling them to a part-time DJ or a venue to sit behind a bar.

    So, when playing 1 cd, I can fade the volume down on that one, whilst bringing up the volume on cd2?
    Dont want to do anything whizz bang, just to play continous records etc

    cheers Carter
  • edited April 2009
    [cite]Posted By: DA9[/cite]
    [cite]Posted By: Carter[/cite]£35 is a bargain mate, take it to an electrical engineer and they will sort the plug out in no time. It's worth making or buying a case for them to save a bit of room and so they don't get bashed about.

    The pitch bend at the right has two controls. The plus and the minus buttons will do if your trying to drag a record down or just want to muck about and the fader control is for setting the pitch/speed/tempo at what you want but the red light will need to be on use the pitch button to turn that on and off.

    The wheel is for cueing your record and can be used for mucking about with the sound a bit too but I tend to leave them alone.

    They will serve you well and for £35 you will make money on them selling them to a part-time DJ or a venue to sit behind a bar.

    So, when playing 1 cd, I can fade the volume down on that one, whilst bringing up the volume on cd2?
    Dont want to do anything whizz bang, just to play continous records etc

    cheers Carter

    Personally I use a computer and PCDJ software, which gives automatic continuous fade in/out of music. The Cd's now only tend to be used for back up or if someone hands me a track at the time.

    I also use Zara Radio which is a free download, great for scheduling, but not much good for fading in and out automatically.

    But in answer to your question, yes, the faders on the mixer will allow you to control the volumes on the two channels, (CD players) you are using, so that you can seamlessly switch between tracks.

    I'm just lazy :-)
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