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taking young children to the valley!

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  • LOL TANGOFLASH!! im son would say hello man man man over and over again lol
  • I thought NYA's post on this subject last year was useful.

    I've been taking my eldest to games here in the States since she was only a few weeks old.  She got her own season ticket at two and has gotten to know some of the players on our local club (D.C. United).

    I was thrilled about this but it was all a bit premature -- a couple of trips to see baseball games at stadiums that are glorified amusement parks killed her interest in going to football games.  Why sit and watch a game in the stands when you could be in a playground or on a carousel or on a moon-bounce?  One baseball stadium we took her to had bumper boats.  Bumper boats.  We are a strange land.

       


  • I take my nephew and he had a season ticket when he was five. He's obsessed with it and really knows his stuff. He sometimes sits there going through suggested formations with me and he's only seven now.

    Every kid is different and I would defo say that maybe take your three year old and see how he enjoys it , if he does then take him again but you may find he gets a bit bored (let's face it we all do sometimes)
  • I'm taking my 5yo daughter to WHL on Saturday for the first time. She's been on at me for over a year saying "Daddy, can I come football with you soon?". Her chance has finally come.

    Have to say, its a little easier for me as I'm going with my usual group of friends and we're all taking our kids together, so at least if the kids dont end up watching the game, they'll keep themselves entertained.

    To be fair to her, she's happily watched a couple of games on TV with me, she knows and recognises a lot of the players, especially vdV (after whom she named her 6ft cuddly teddy Rafa!) and knows a lot of the clean songs too so hopefully she'll enjoy the experience.
  • Going with a bunch of other kids is a good idea.
  • I think it's harder to take kids to watch football now days and get them to enjoy it because stadiums are all seaters, I remember my Dad taking me when we played at Sellout park and being able to move around and occupy myself when I was getting bored. It must be so boring for a kid to be made to sit down at the Valley for 90+ minutes not being able to stretch their legs or play about freely. My 2 nephews have asked to be taken home by half time on two occasions now. I'm still trying to work out myself what would be a good age to bring my son, I have a few years to think about as he is only 4 months old.
  • If you get tickets in the family stand there are plenty of places for kids to run around!

  • It may be different though in 3 or 4 years time we may be playing in front of crowds of 27000 again!
  • All kids are different i guess but from my experience when they hit about 10 years old they seem to become more interested in it. My 11 year old threatened not to go on holiday when he found out we were missing the opening game. My 8 year old vowed we were rubbish last year and he wouldn't be going back but our 'thrashing' of Den Bosch seems to have turned him round 
  • Used to take our kids - at times it was difficult to keep them amused and it was occasionally annoying when they were not much interested in what was going on on the pitch. We had to as we're both fans. When they got old enough to leave at home alone we did. A couple of years later our younger son insisted on having a season ticket again and he's been going ever since. Our oldest is also a fan these days, but doesn't get to many games.
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  • i took my two youngest daughters to an fa cup match about 8, 9 years ago...they talked all the way through the match and moaned to their mother when they got home about it being too noisy, which was a bit rich, given the yakkety yak that they were giving it for 90 minutes i'm surprised they even noticed...they've never been back...
  • I think that the test of whether he watches it on TV is a good one. My three year old boy will actually sit on my lap for 10 minutes to watch a match. Then he's off playing, running, tugging me etc. I see no reason why that would be any different in the actual stadium and so there is no way I would take him.

    I started going when I was 7 and got bored (we were pretty bad in 1980/81) so I don't plan to take my boys before this age. It may be possible at 5 or 6 if we're playing a big team.
  • I first took my eldest when he was 5 - he's been coming ever since and now he's 10, he's much more in to it. The youngest started at 3 1/2 - he's now 4 1/2. He had to be bribed and kept amused with sweets, crisps and a DS first of all so I've limited the games.

    But recently, he's wanted to play football in the garden, he wears his Charlton shirt, he wants a new shirt and he wants to come on Saturday.

    I think they'll honestly give you signs of when they're ready - if they're not showing a lot of interest in the game naturally, be prepared for them to be bored!
  • I will be taking my four year old on saturday, he has his 2nd full season ticket and has been to nearly 50 football matches. He loves going to the games, wants to wear his charlton shirt all the time, he knows the red robin song and valley floyd road. We have been taking him since he was 6 weeks old. What we do is have a bag full of treats for him which include no sweets, fruit, cucumber, tomatoes, grapes, with a pkt crisps. What we also take is a small bag of cherios they take ages to eat. He watches the game, robbie elliots his fav player(hate to tell him) and he only gets a little bored 10 mins from the end. I wish my parents had taken me to football when I was younger, I was 10 when I went to my first game.
  • I took my son at 5 and he sat and watched it all (now 9) and enjoyed it. We have to get there for 1.30 everymatch as he likes to watch the warm up's and guess who i playing. He is a good footballer and really loves the game. In winter I take a hotwater bottle as cold and kids do not go together. Started going to night games last year whem his Mum let's hime and he loves these even more with the floodlights.

     All in all, it is what Dad's should do - before they become a Man U fan along with all his mates - but never go.

    After all, a kid has to learn how to both win and lose!

  • In the early days at Selhurst we used to have a half time football match under the Sainsburys End - we were all 7-12 sort of age.

    Highlight of the day many a time

  • edited August 2011

    In the early days at Selhurst we used to have a half time football match under the Sainsburys End - we were all 7-12 sort of age.

    Highlight of the day many a time


    Used to do that between the Floyd Road entrance and the old South terracing beneath The Heights ... wouldn't work these days ;-)
  • Took the eldest to his first game today. We travelled up on the train for an hour and 40 minutes from Whitstable. I kept him entertained with colouring, some games, and a bit of Angry Birds on the iPhone. He was so excited to get there. We headed for the fish and chip shop first for some food then went into the club shop which was busier than usual for an hour before kick off, probably because it's the first game and people were looking at all the new merchandise. I thought I'd never get him a kit to wear but he was so adamant that he wanted one as part of his birthday present that I bought the home one for him. He had the number 5 printed on the back so that he can wear it at his birthday party in a couple of weeks. 

    When we walked into the stadium the first thing he said was "Amazing daddy!". We had seats in the North Lower directly behind the goal about 15 rows back. He enjoyed the warm up watching all the players doing their different routines. As the match progressed I had to keep him entertained a bit more as he was getting tired. But during the second half he was a bit more interested. He followed Morrison a bit more closely than the other players because of the association with the number. He thought he was very good at heading. 

    After the match we collected the shirt with the number printed on the back.

    The train journey seemed to go quicker on the way home and he was really glad to have gone, probably more to the fact that it was a bit of bonding time with Dad on his own without mum and brother there as well. He loved the 'fish' on the big screen and kept on saying it out loud when he got home which made the wife laugh a lot. 

    I'm glad that the team managed to put on a fairly good display for him and didn't let us down. I must say that all the fans that stopped and spoke to him were asking whether it was his first game and made him feel very welcome which I am proud of.
  • edited August 2011
    In my experience it just depends on the child. My mate and I took his boys when each of them was 5, one was bored in seconds, the other loved it.

    I took my lad to his first game when he was 3 and he was OK. I then took him again and he was very unsettled and I then didn't take him again until his was 6. 

    I took my daughter when she was 5 and she became bored very easily. She also didn't like the shouting. She is 8 now and she loves singing "Red Red Robin" and "Oh South London", (with the child friendly line "its full of chips, jelly and Charlton").

    It helps if its a good game with Charlton goals and excitement.
  • Senpai, glag you had a great time. Brings back memories of seeing my dad at weekends and heading off to the valley.
    Running around the porta cabins collecting autographs and sneaking my dads mates in with the passes id take out to them :).
    I hope you have plenty of more weekends like that to come :)
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  • Well if anyone takes their kids to a game don't let them annoy those who want to watch the match.  A particular hate of mine are those who just bang the unoccupied seats in front of them.
  • First game for my 6 year old girl yesterday. In the family stand, they've got a sweet shop (very handy) and midway through first half she asked can she play Leapster, then was half watching Stephens scored and she was hooked for the rest of the game. She asked what the words were for each song, (sweets, jelly and Charlton is now banked - not that I told her t*ts, f*nny and Charlton of course) and she sang along and was also impressed by the fact that we have drummers, bonus. Will have to see how she copes with a 0 0 or 0 1, but glad her 1st time at the Valley was one that she'll remember fondly! :)
  • edited August 2011
    Took the eldest to his first game today. We travelled up on the train for an hour and 40 minutes from Whitstable. I kept him entertained with colouring, some games, and a bit of Angry Birds on the iPhone. He was so excited to get there. We headed for the fish and chip shop first for some food then went into the club shop which was busier than usual for an hour before kick off, probably because it's the first game and people were looking at all the new merchandise. I thought I'd never get him a kit to wear but he was so adamant that he wanted one as part of his birthday present that I bought the home one for him. He had the number 5 printed on the back so that he can wear it at his birthday party in a couple of weeks. 

    When we walked into the stadium the first thing he said was "Amazing daddy!". We had seats in the North Lower directly behind the goal about 15 rows back. He enjoyed the warm up watching all the players doing their different routines. As the match progressed I had to keep him entertained a bit more as he was getting tired. But during the second half he was a bit more interested. He followed Morrison a bit more closely than the other players because of the association with the number. He thought he was very good at heading. 

    After the match we collected the shirt with the number printed on the back.

    The train journey seemed to go quicker on the way home and he was really glad to have gone, probably more to the fact that it was a bit of bonding time with Dad on his own without mum and brother there as well. He loved the 'fish' on the big screen and kept on saying it out loud when he got home which made the wife laugh a lot. 

    I'm glad that the team managed to put on a fairly good display for him and didn't let us down. I must say that all the fans that stopped and spoke to him were asking whether it was his first game and made him feel very welcome which I am proud of.
    What lovely story, glad he had a great day....................You could really impress his Mum by bringing him to the Liberal club at the next home game. ; )
  • First game for my 6 year old girl yesterday. In the family stand, they've got a sweet shop (very handy) and midway through first half she asked can she play Leapster, then was half watching Stephens scored and she was hooked for the rest of the game. She asked what the words were for each song, (sweets, jelly and Charlton is now banked - not that I told her t*ts, f*nny and Charlton of course) and she sang along and was also impressed by the fact that we have drummers, bonus. Will have to see how she copes with a 0 0 or 0 1, but glad her 1st time at the Valley was one that she'll remember fondly! :)

    Sweets, jelly and charlton....much better words than the ones currently sung by the spotty yoofs...
  • My daughter was a mascot on Saturday, and I would recommend this experience to anyone who takes their kids to games. It was a birthday gift and although she had been to a few games before due to her friends supporting so-called bigger teams she also had a liking for Arsenal. Not after Saturday though because she is now firmly in the Charlton camp. Her new kit has all the players signatures, plus CP's, on it. Those responsible for looking after mascots at the club, including the players, manager and chairman gave both her, and us as parents, an experience of a lifetime.
  • I'm 27 ... and thats too early
  • I'm just on the verge of buying a season ticket for me and my 6 year old daughter and was wondering if anyone here has got a season ticket in the North East Quadrant? I've only ever sat in the East or West Stands so was wondering what the view/perspective was like in this part of the ground. Any comments gratefully received.
  • We sit in the north east quadrant/FS.  I think it's OK, with a clear view of all the action and a great view of the stadium overall.  I'd avoid going too close to the pitch, as it's harder to see long distance.  It's also further to take your kid to the bog from there and quite a sun trap in the warmer months.  However; it is closer for a "high five" from the mascot, if they're into that.  The gradient is quite steep, so keep hold of them, if young.  Swearing is minimal, other than when covered end is in full voice for a Semedo type song, but you can get away with that by singing a clean version loudly in their ear at the same time "he really hates Millwall" etc.
  • that's great, many thanks for the info. I'll hopefully get something around 25 rows or so back near an aisle so we'll get a decent panoramic view by the sounds of it and easy access for the many loo visits throughout thee game no doubt! Not too worried about the occasional bit of ripe language, the missus swears like a docker, so my daughters well used to it!
  • My youngest is coming Saturday. He's worn his new kit 4 times already since the game vs Bournemouth. A new fan is born - with no pressure - makes a Dad feel proud! :-)
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